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Electoral Process

The most recent Town Council elections took place on 4 May 2017. The next normal local elections are due to take place in May 2021. The elections process is managed by Wiltshire Council and the latest documentation and guidance can be found at http://www.wiltshire.gov.uk/elections

Most people are eligible to stand for election but there are a few rules. For example you must be at least 18 or older on the day of nomination and be a UK, Commonwealth or European Union citizen. Detailed criteria for eligibility is set out in Section 79 of the Local Government Act 1972. Section 80 of the Act sets out why a person may be disqualified and, therefore, ineligible. The legislation can be seen at http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1972/70/pdfs/ukpga_19720070_en.pdf.


 

Current Councillor Vacancies

 

There is currently a Town Councillor vacancy for the Corsham Town Ward. This will be filled by co-option, which means the current Councillors vote on who will join them. Details of the nomination and co-option process are on the News pages. The closing date for nominations is 5pm on Monday 7 August 2017.

 

What do Councillors (also known as members/elected members) do?

 

An individual Councillor’s role is to respond to the needs and aspirations of the local community and provide leadership. Councillors have three main elements to their work.

1) Decision making - Through meetings and attending committees with other elected members, Councillors decide which activities to support, where money should be spent, what services should be delivered and what policies should be implemented.

2) Monitoring - Councillors make sure that their decisions lead to efficient and effective services by keeping an eye on how well things are working.

3) Getting involved locally - As local representatives, Councillors have responsibilities towards their constituents and local organisations. These responsibilities and duties often depend on what the Councillor wants to achieve and how much time is available.


How much time does it take up?


Some Councillors spend two or three hours per week on Town Council business but many spend much more time than this, depending on their interests, role and committee memberships.

In the main, being a Town Councillor is an enjoyable way of contributing to your community, and helping to make it a better place to live, work and visit. 

 

Knowledge, skills and experience

Councillors do not need to meet any specific competency requirements but should have some knowledge and understanding of local affairs and the local community. The Town Council is committed to training and development and there is a wide range of topics where training will be offered.


What next?


To find out more about what your Town Council does please visit the Town Hall, attend one or two meetings, or speak to one of our Councillors or staff.

Additional information is available at The National Association of Local Councils (NALC) website, www.nalc.gov.uk.

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